Fashionably located and decorated, the brand-new Mandarin Oriental, Paris instills a frisson of pleasure

Arriving in Paris instantly lifts the spirits. There’s something intoxicating about the grand boulevards, the monumental architecture, the manicured green spaces and the stylish enclaves dotted around France’s premier city. Once fêted as a beacon of the Age of Enlightenment, this European capital continues to boast a formidable reputation for creativity, culture, learning and gastronomy, one that draws travellers from all corners of the globe.

The private terrace of the Royal Oriental Suite at Mandarin Oriental, Paris

The private terrace of the Royal Oriental Suite at Mandarin Oriental, Paris

Set in the heart of the first arrondissement, rue Saint-Honoré is surely the city’s most coveted address, home to the haute-couture industry and minutes from landmarks such as the Place Vendôme, Tuileries Gardens, Opéra Garnier and the Louvre. While its history can be traced back to the 13th century, today the fashionable street thrives with shoppers browsing the exclusive boutiques and foodies sampling cuisine and fine wine served in enchanting eateries. It could only be here, then, that Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group would choose to put down its roots, arriving in France with a promise not only to deliver luxury, refinement and the award-winning service it is renowned for, but also an element of surprise.

Pont Louis-Philippe and views of Notre Dame

Pont Louis-Philippe and views of Notre Dame

‘We are flying the flag for the brand in Europe, so we have aimed to create a magical experience for international and local guests, combining the highest standards of service with a warmth and kindness that can sometimes be missing at this level,’ explains Philippe Leboeuf, General Manager of Mandarin Oriental, Paris. ‘We offer modernity and elegance, providing visitors with space and light in the centre of Paris. You can expect to find the most generously proportioned rooms in the city, an abundance of suites, an all-suite spa concept, a landscaped indoor garden and cutting-edge restaurants helmed by Executive Chef Thierry Marx.’

Unwilling to compromise on location, Mandarin Oriental waited patiently for its position on rue Saint-Honoré, taking up residence in a trio of Thirties office buildings which have been transformed by acclaimed architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte into a majestically unified structure. Wilmotte turned to the timeless Thirties style of the protected, original façade, first designed by Charles Letrosne, a noted local architect who contributed to the 1937 Paris World Exhibition, and replicated the use of materials and detailing to create a sense of harmony throughout the eight-storey hotel. So, natural Parisian stone is found inside and out, with moulding and frescoes, while the exterior gates, conceived by Letrosne all those years ago, are now honoured by a new, majestic iron-gate entrance featuring the same fish-scale pattern.

To inject a fresh lease of life into the structure, Wilmotte decided to remove the central building, opening up the space for a stunning interior garden, landscaped with different species of trees, plants and flowers, set around a reflective water pool. Extending the green theme vertically, some of the guest rooms benefit from tree-filled terraces, while one of the courtyard walls is planted with vegetation laid out gracefully across horizontal lines. Bronze shutters, copper roofing and gilded metalwork all play with the light in this atmospheric inner courtyard that forms the heart of the hotel. Wilmotte’s approach has not only brought a wow factor to Mandarin Oriental, Paris, but has also earned the property green credentials in the form of HQE (High Quality Environmental) certification.

Crucially, both the Thirties façade and interior garden have provided rich sources of inspiration for interior designers Sybille de Margerie, Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manku, who, together with Wilmotte, have striven to define what a grand Parisian hotel can be in our contemporary age – each developing their vision of a palace conceived for the 21st century.

Place de la Concorde, the capital’s largest square

Place de la Concorde, the capital’s largest square

France’s first lady of design, Sybille de Margerie set up her own firm over 20 years ago and has since built an impressive track record in hotel interiors, garnering awards for her renovation of The Grand, Amsterdam, and acclaim for Cheval Blanc in Courchevel, one of eight French hotels distinguished by the official rank of ‘palace’, indicating that they are the best the country has to offer. Other projects have taken her beyond Europe, such as the Old Cataract in Aswan and a new luxury property in Tel Aviv.

Starting with a philosophy of tradition-meets-innovation, de Margerie fashions her ideas from the identity of each location, aiming to communicate an art of living specific to the town and country. ‘Mandarin Oriental wanted to share a uniquely Parisian viewpoint with their guests,’ she reveals. ‘While we wished to respect the city’s history and heritage, our challenge has been to take these qualities and give them a contemporary twist.’

Looking to the Thirties as a starting point – a period that was ‘alive with richness and variety’ – de Margerie has drawn on era-specific textures and materials, such as lacquer, crystal and gold leaf, but treated them in modern ways. The Thirties story unfolds further through the presence of four Man Ray photographs, which were rendered evocatively in the headboards in guest rooms and reproduced subtly as visual ornamentation in the corridors.

The Tuileries Gardens

The Tuileries Gardens

‘Man Ray took an incredibly modern approach to photography back in the Twenties and Thirties,’ says de Margerie. ‘Although his photographs of The Kiss and the female form are quite abstract, I felt they evoked a certain language of romance. His story was also resonant because he was an American who loved Paris so much that he decided to stay here. We hope guests today will encounter the same feeling.’

Focusing on the neighbourhood in which the hotel is situated, the designer was also keen to represent the glamour, intricacy and craftsmanship of the haute-couture world. This has been achieved through a palette of signature, fashion-led accent colours, from fuchsia to pink to orange. And Iranian-born Ali Mahdavi, whose photographs have graced the covers of magazines such as Vanity Fair, has contributed portraits of the fashionable female form to the guest suites and corridors.

To reinforce the haute-couture ambience, de Margerie has also formed a fascinating partnership with Maison Lesage, a distinguished family firm that has been producing embroidery for the biggest names in high fashion since 1924, including Vionnet, Schiaparelli, Dior, Chanel and Givenchy. Not only was the atelier commissioned to create a fan for Mandarin Oriental, Paris – a picture of velvet, glacé leather, vintage sequins, pearls and butterflies – but also to handcraft embroidery specially for the guest suites. ‘Our work fits perfectly with the philosophy of haute couture, in which every detail is given consideration,’ says de Margerie. ‘In this hotel, you won’t find standard things; almost everything is bespoke design.’

In this hotel, you won’t find standard things; almost everything is bespoke design
- Designer Sybille De Margerie

While de Margerie has overseen the aesthetics of the hotel’s lobby, spa, guest rooms and suites, design agency Jouin Manku has taken the reins of the restaurants and bar, collaborating with celebrated French chef Thierry Marx, who directs the hotel’s delicious food and beverage offering. Although Patrick Jouin has a background in industrial and product design – he joined Philippe Starck’s team early in his career – the designer switched his focus to the interiors of restaurants when he was talent spotted by the legendary Alain Ducasse. His eponymous agency took a new turn in 2001 when he met Canadian architect Sanjit Manku, a fresh talent in Paris who quickly became a professional partner. Since then, the pair have completed renovations to restaurants and bars at various hotels in the Dorchester Collection and developed the Swatch Art Peace Hotel in Shanghai.

Travellers want to see the Paris of now, a place based on innovation and audacity
- Designer Sanjit Manku

Detail from Man Ray’s Black and White printed on velvet in the Premier Atelier Suite

Detail from Man Ray’s Black and White printed on velvet in the Premier Atelier Suite

‘What was exciting about the Mandarin Oriental brand coming to Paris was that it had no weight on its shoulders because it wasn’t purchasing a historic building, rather it was seeking to create a future,’ says Manku. ‘Travellers don’t come to Paris expecting the traditional postcard image any more, the themed Louis XVI reproduction furniture, the city that is frozen in time. They want to see the Paris of now, a place based on innovation and audacity, a destination that is spectacular, handcrafted and boundary-pushing.’ For Jouin, the exciting challenge has been to find a new voice for Paris, one that will meet expectations of romance, light and sensuality – and one that is truly unique to the capital.

These collective outlooks have come together in an interior that brims with passion, delighting the senses with perspectives, textures and unexpected finishes. The journey begins at the iron gate, through a porte-cochère, where sliding doors open to reveal another world. Purple fabric woven with fibre-optic lights frames the entry point, while a Swarovski-crystal display of butterflies dances overhead. It’s as though guests are entering an oversized jewellery box. The butterfly quickly emerges as a recurring motif across the public spaces and guest floors, connecting the interior to the landscaped garden beyond. The creatures pop up in the most surprising of locations, represented by embroidery, or nestled in ceramic form in displays produced by Italian sculptor Marcello Lo Giudice, or gathered in circular patterns woven into the carpets.

The pool in The Spa

The pool in The Spa

From here, the green canopy of the interior garden beckons in a busy social space that connects all-day French dining restaurant Camélia on one side and Bar 8 on the other. A distinctive Garden Table allows for private dining in an outdoor setting, with guests invited to perch comfortably in a playful ‘birdcage’. Seeking to bring natural elements of the oasis garden inside, Jouin and Manku have bordered Camélia with an underlit wall of curvaceous white petals. Wooden decking spills into the interior, before giving way to gorgeous stone flooring in a naturalistic fade, while lamps sprout from the ground over tabletops made from enamelled lava stone, again mirrored in the outdoor and indoor portions of the restaurant. A central serving counter in the restaurant invites diners to engage with chef Marx and his team, who prepare French, Thai and Japanese dishes live, evoking a homely feel. The inventiveness of Marx’s team is also on display in the adjoining Cake Shop, strategically placed to tempt even the most calorie-adverse fashionistas.

Using a small selection of noble materials, such as wood, stone, plaster and leather, Jouin and Manku have choreographed spaces for the ‘body’ – artfully layering lines, colours and forms to stimulate different sensations. As Jouin says, ‘There shouldn’t be fireworks everywhere, but a choreography of emotions.’ Building on their inside/outside theme, Bar 8 is reminiscent of a clearing in a forest, with tinted oak wall panels inlaid with Lalique glass ‘raindrops’, a Murano glass curtain that conjures up rainfall, and smoky black glass tabletops that mysteriously glow from within. The eye can’t help wandering, however, to the anchoring design feature of this sexy space. Weighing nine tonnes, the monolithic, gris pulpis stone bar, extracted in one piece from a Spanish quarry, then hand-sculpted and polished in Italy before being delivered to France, is, without doubt, an incredible feat of engineering.

The Louvre’s Pyramid

The Louvre’s Pyramid

From here it is possible to access the gastronomic haven Sur Mesure par Thierry Marx, a cocooning setting for a culinary voyage that revolves around the chef’s ‘techno-emotional’ approach to cuisine, presented in two tasting menus. Jouin Manku has designed everything, including the porcelain dinner service, but the eye-catching material in this intimate room is tailor-made cream fabric draped in smooth and deconstructed arrangements. This ‘symphony of fabric’, comprising over 300 individual pieces that had to be assembled with the utmost precision, contrasts with a black elliptical sculpture that floats in a central lightwell.

Another temple of indulgence and wellbeing is to be found in the hotel’s dual-level Spa, which has magical surprises in store for even the most regular of spa-goers. Journey to the lower floors to an intimate, holistic environment, in which walls come alive with three-dimensional origami flowers and the ceilings glow. Unwind in the 14m-long pool while watching a poetic projection of a living garden, as butterflies take flight and an imaginary wind causes flowers to gently undulate. The seven low-lit Spa Suites, meanwhile, complete with their own steam showers, changing rooms and patina mother-of-pearl wallcoverings, are built for an enveloping escape from the outside world.

A Deluxe Room

A Deluxe Room

Of course, every luxury hotel must be judged by the strength of its guest rooms and Mandarin Oriental, Paris does not disappoint. With views of the garden or rue Saint-Honoré, the residential rooms have an inherent fluidity that means guests can use the space in the way that suits them. Understated hues, with colour pops of orange, magenta and plum, work harmoniously with the tactile wall and floor coverings, in addition to the superlative choices of tinted mahogany, glass and lacquer. Gleaming white marble and mosaic bathrooms are adorned with oversized mirrors and leather-edged vanity units finished with bronze handles.

Featuring bespoke furniture and objets d’art, the 39 suites, some of them specifically couture-themed, benefit from varying layouts to ensure all guests can find a home-away-from-home for their individual needs. Bathed in light on the eighth floor, the spectacular 350sq m Royal Mandarin Suite, with artwork commissioned from Thierry Bisch, Gérard Roveri and Jean-Baptiste Huynh, is located among the rooftops of Paris, providing the most stunning views, particularly from the sensorial bathroom which has a picture window looking out to the Eiffel Tower.

The rooftop Atelier Suite is yet another jewel in the crowning achievement that is Mandarin Oriental, Paris. Poetic, handcrafted and sensual, the hotel brings an updated design vocabulary to the city, showcasing what Paris has to offer in the 21st century.

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Mandarin Oriental, Paris

251 rue Saint-Honoré,
75001 Paris, France

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