In Munich you are spoilt for choice when it comes to cafés. From a traditional outlet to a modern roastery, here’s a selection of the best – all with a delicious assortment of pâtisserie

Locals as well as tourists head to Viktualienmarkt for its fantastic fresh produce and, in the summer, beer garden. It’s also home to coffee roastery Kaffeerösterei-Viktualienmarkt and Café Nymphenburg Sekt. The latter – a café, bistro and bar in one – serves breakfast, lunch and evening drinks, alongside homemade sweet treats such as chocolate and sour cream tarts.

Kaffeerösterei at Munich’s Viktualienmarkt

Kaffeerösterei at Munich’s Viktualienmarkt

A minute’s walk away on Frauenstraße is The Victoria House, where the decor and food is based – as the name suggests – on a traditional British home from yesteryear. This means dark wood furniture, portraits in oils on the walls, and, on the menu, traditional cakes and scones. There are now five outposts in the city, this being the first to open. A hundred metres away is the tiny but charming Café Fräulein. Everything here is baked or cooked daily and without preservatives at the café’s own Zimtschneckenfabrik bakery. Order the indulgent Münchner Schokoladentraum (Munich Chocolate Dream) cake or the popular cinnamon rolls.

Kaffeerösterei’s tempting treats

Kaffeerösterei’s tempting treats

Also in this area (just around the corner from the Isartor, one of the four main gates of the medieval city wall) is Vits, one of the best coffee houses in the city. It’s primarily a coffee roastery, though once you’ve chosen your brew, it’s well worth pairing it with a piece of apple cake or a plum cake with a crumble topping.

Dallmayr has a well-earned reputation for culinary excellence, but not only for its Michelin-starred restaurant; its classic-looking Café-Bistro is special for reasons that extend beyond the refined interiors and first-class service, with specialist teas and coffees from places as far afield as Papua New Guinea and Peru. Breakfast and lunch here is wonderful, but a coffee and a choice from the pâtisserie, and the view over Marienhof (the historical market square), is motivation enough to make a reservation.

Café Fräulein’s charming interior

Café Fräulein’s charming interior

Before suffering war damage, Luitpold was a grand Viennese-style café-restaurant and today’s more modest version pays a nod to its heritage with Doric columns and a glass-roofed Palm Garden. After indulging in a piece of the celebrated Luitpoldtorte (made using a cake recipe that dates to Luitpold’s post-war reopening in 1962) from the café’s superb confiserie, buy a small box of truffles from the pralinen counter for later.

Brasserie OskarMaria is located in Literaturhaus (Literature House), a neo-Renaissance exhibition and event centre that showcases great authors, past and present. This is another refined place to relax with a bite to eat as it has excellent lunch, dinner and wine menus. A coffee and chocolate éclair, or perhaps cheesecake or cherry and almond cake, with a favourite book also makes for an enjoyable afternoon here.

Pâtisserie at Brasserie OskarMaria

Pâtisserie at Brasserie OskarMaria

Munich’s Glockenbach and Gärtnerplatz quarters are arguably the most fashionable in the city at present. Café Dukatz (with a sister pâtisserie across the city at St-Anna-Platz) has long been popular. Café Glockenbach and Trachtenvogl both attract a hipper, younger crowd; at the former, go for a gooey chocolate cake with cherry compote, and at the latter, a lemon cheesecake.

Finally, don’t miss The Lounge at Mandarin Oriental, Munich, which offers its own Weihnachtlicher (Christmas) tea. As waiters serve hazelnut-pumpkin spiced cake, and scones with clotted cream and a wintry jam, the beautifully decorated tree sets the festive scene.

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